Maurice Ecard, Les Serpertieres premier cru (Savigny-les-Beaune, France 1987 & 1988) I drink a lot of wine, but I don’t bother cellaring it myself. That’s what a great wine shop is for. Let them do the work of acquiring and storing rare and aged bottles, then swoop in when you’re ready for a treat. I got these for an indulgent taste test of aged Burgundy, to toast my own aging with an old friend. It offered an interesting lesson. The older vintage, 1987, had the most life left in it: prominent red berries that, as one person put it, seemed freshly macerated, along with lots of pinot noir funk, bright acidity and flavors that lingered forever on our palates. For the 1988, however, the fruit had all but faded away, overpowered by the funky notes of aging. Both were lovely wines, but the ‘88 will be so for a while to come still. What a difference a year makes.
Maurice Ecard, Les Serpertieres premier cru (Savigny-les-Beaune, France 1987 & 1988) I drink a lot of wine, but I don’t bother cellaring it myself. That’s what a great wine shop is for. Let them do the work of acquiring and storing rare and aged bottles, then swoop in when you’re ready for a treat. I got these for an indulgent taste test of aged Burgundy, to toast my own aging with an old friend. It offered an interesting lesson. The older vintage, 1987, had the most life left in it: prominent red berries that, as one person put it, seemed freshly macerated, along with lots of pinot noir funk, bright acidity and flavors that lingered forever on our palates. For the 1988, however, the fruit had all but faded away, overpowered by the funky notes of aging. Both were lovely wines, but the ‘88 will be so for a while to come still. What a difference a year makes.

Maurice Ecard, Les Serpertieres premier cru (Savigny-les-Beaune, France 1987 & 1988)
I drink a lot of wine, but I don’t bother cellaring it myself. That’s what a great wine shop is for. Let them do the work of acquiring and storing rare and aged bottles, then swoop in when you’re ready for a treat. I got these for an indulgent taste test of aged Burgundy, to toast my own aging with an old friend.

It offered an interesting lesson. The older vintage, 1987, had the most life left in it: prominent red berries that, as one person put it, seemed freshly macerated, along with lots of pinot noir funk, bright acidity and flavors that lingered forever on our palates. For the 1988, however, the fruit had all but faded away, overpowered by the funky notes of aging. Both were lovely wines, but the ‘88 will be so for a while to come still. What a difference a year makes.